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General Interest

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General Interest
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Price: $22.00
In 1972 Jim Kegley and Doug Everman started a new weekly publication in Wheelersburg Ohio, and called it the Scioto Voice. In 1976 Jim took over complete ownership of the paper. Jim's column appeared in the first published edition, February 8, 1973, and most issues since that time. He named his weekly column "High Notes," Nearly all of the 2,150 issues carried one of his writings--except for occasional lapses where he traveled, had guest writers, or was ill. Although Jim no longer owns the Scioto Voice, his column remains an important feature of the paper as he reminisces and brings the reader up-to-date on the people, places, and events that were so much part of the lives of the people in Scioto County. "High Notes" provides a wonderful history of the area from the 1950s up to the present.
Price: $20.00
Gary Knepp, local attorney and historian, has uncovered some amazing and interesting cases and facts surrounding Clermont County's contribution to the antislavery movement and military service. This book uncovers its legal past from its first civil rights attorney, John Jolliffe; its contribution to Ohio's constitution; the first chief justice to the Ohio Supreme Court, Hugh L. Nichols; the first female, Anna Quimby, admitted to the United States Supreme Court. It also covers one of the wealthiest men in the world, New Richmond's John Haussermann, "The Gold King of the Philippines." Other stories include, among others, Ohio's first environmental criminal case. A fascinating read.
Price: $12.95
"A sex scandal, blood on the walls of the U.S. Capitol, stories of ghosts--all that is part of Caroline Miller's new book. But, more than that, her well-researched and readable work reminds us again of the fury of the political world, the place of honor in 19th century America, and the tragedy that resulted. It is a story that still has meaning for us today--and Caroline Miller is to be congratulated for rediscovering that forgotten part of the past."---James C. Klotter, State Historian of Kentucky.

"A long-forgotten and little-known story about Kentucky in our nation's capital, Caroline Miller's fascinating and true tale includes politics, murder, sex, and ghosts. Meticulously researched, the scandal centered around a popular Kentucky congressman, rocked Washington, D.C., in the late 1800s, and still leaves us wondering whether justice was done."---Ben Chandler, Executive Director, Kentucky Humanities Council.
Price: $24.99
The Cincinnati Fire Department was the first fire department organized to combine the use of horses, steam engines, and a paid municipal department and celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2003. This colorful book gives an overview of the organization of fifty-five fire stations, ladder companies, and other support units in Cincinnati. The publication also tells of the first fireboat on the canal in the Centennial Celebration of 1888 and the changing role of the salvage corps. A color map showing the streets and wards in 1853 is also included for ease in finding the location for the early stations.
Price: $40.00
This beautiful coffee table book tells a story of the Cincinnati area’s history and values through the public artwork it displays. The sculpture of the late 1800s celebrates Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky’s strong German heritage, memorials commemorate the people who contributed to the growth of the Greater Cincinnati area, and contemporary themes delight and amuse us—a potpourri of artwork from national and internationally known artists.
Price: $19.95
In this historical novel, the Ku Klux Klan thought the town of Donegal, Indiana, would be the perfect place to organize a new chapter. They intended to run out the blacks, Jews, Irish, Catholics, and immigrants so they could gain economic control of the area. What the Klan did not count on was the determination of an Irish Catholic baker who was determined to save his town. Historical facts are skillfully woven into this absorbing story of conflict that pits former good friends, neighbors, and customers against one another while struggling with a declining business environment, family issues, and religious tenets. When the author found proof that his family legend was true, he created the fictional town of Donegal to illustrate the conflict that America went through during the early part of the last century. His research uncovered evidence of Klan actions described in this story, though they may not have occurred specifically in Indiana.
Price: $12.95
Portsmouth, Ohio, native Margaret Russell uses the Japanese verse form of haiku to convey emotions steeped in mystery and romance.
Price: $22.50
Explore the Buckeye State’s folklore, towns, and people—a snapshot of Buckeye life, past and present. Learn about the frontier legend Gen. "Mad” Anthony Wayne; nitro shooters, tattooed chickens, and moonshiners; the phenomenon of Eugene, Sabina’s cadaver-in-residence; the glory years of Indian Lake; and, of course, quintessential ghost towns named Sodom, Knockemstiff, Rural, Mudsock, San Toy, and Dull. Described as a love song to Ohio, this publication is a key to a time long past, when places like Whigville, Tunnel, and Toots Corner ruled the day.
Price: $28.00
Safe houses, trustworthy individuals, pathways, abandoned shelters, and unattended skiffs--these were crucial pieces of information that were spread, through word or song, from plantation to plantation, by way of the "grapevine." Throughout the Borderlands, this communication would help the slave to find freedom, by way of the Underground Railroad. The conductors and abolitionists on both sides of the Ohio River--consisting of slaves, free men of color, white and black residents, religious men, and other sympathetic citizens--were likely to suffer bodily inflictions, imprisionment, and monetary loss for aiding these fugitives in their flight from slavery and quest for freedom. Caroline Miller skillfully relates their stories through interviews, newspaper accounts, court cases, government records, and other published and unpublished accounts, so that these times, and these people are not forgotten.
Price: $22.50

Jim LaBarbara, dubbed "The Music Professor," a name given to him when he worked in Cincinnati with WLW, WCKY, WSAI, and WGRR FM, among others. The moniker became prophetic as he earned a master's degree in broadcasting and taught as an adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati. A respected musicologist on early rock and roll, he was named one of the "Top 40 Radio Personalities of All Time," is listed in the Rock Jock Hall of Fame, and was inducted into the Radio/Television/Broadcasters Hall of Fame in Akron, Ohio. Working throughout the years under the names of Jimmy Holiday in Meadville, Titusville, and DuBois, Pennsylvania, and J. Bentley Starr in Erie, Pennsylvania, he began using his real name on WKYC and WIXY in Cleveland and Denver.

Jim shares his honest firsthand account of his experience during a dynamic and sometimes turbulent life on and off the radio. He was there when the controversy of playing music performed by black artists was coming to an end, and was later innocently thrust in the middle of the payola scandals. When Jim LaBarbara did his first radio show in 1959 he couldn't have imagined it would lead to a Hall of Fame career that spanned more than fifty years; one where he would work on some of the country's most powerful stations. There have been a couple of "Guardian Angels" in his life and a "Hell's Angel" who saved his life.

For those who grew up in the '50s and the baby boomer generation, along with others interested in pop culture, this story will transport you back to the beginning of rock music. Jim was with the Supremes, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones. He interviewed hundreds of entertainers including Bill Haley, Jackie Wilson, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, James Brown, Ray Charles, Jerry Lee Lewis, Neil Diamond, John Denver, and others. It is with the help of these interviews that he tells his own story and in so doing gives a unique perspective of the history of rock 'n' roll.

Price: $14.95

My Living Memories Project Journal is an inspirational, interactive, and comforting workbook designed to help readers keep alive the memories and legacies of loved ones. A companion to the award-winning book, The Living Memories Project: Legacies That Last, it empowers and inspires readers to transcend grief with a simple message. By remembering the lives and legacies of loved ones, we can take concrete steps to heal ourselves. By remembering and celebrating how they lived--rather than how they died--we can enhance our resilience, compassion, and creativity, and renew our desire to live happy, productive, and meaningful lives.

The journal features soothing artwork, as well as inspiring and comforting quotes from the original book and other sources. Interactive questions and activities are designed to trigger reflections and writing activities that will keep the memories of loved ones alive. The book is an appropriate gift for those who are missing loved ones. It has also been recognized by professionals as a valuable tool to console and help the bereaved move forward after loss.

Meryl Ain, Ed.D., The Comfort Coach, inspires people to transcend their losses by keeping alive the memories, passions, values and legacies of those they have lost. She helps to promote healing by providing professionals, organizations, and individuals with the tools to foster optimistic thinking, positive projects, and resilience. A former teacher and school administrator, her articles have appeared in The Huffington Post, MariaShriver.com, The New York Jewish Week, The New York Times, and Newsday.

Learn more about Meryl Ain and the Living Memories Project

Website

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Twitter: @livmemoriesproj @DrMerylAin

Price: $19.95
Indiana’s little-known Shaker community is brought to life in the letters from a collection of rare Shaker documents and diaries edited by Cheryl Bauer and assembled in this book as well as accounts by William Henry Harrison and other early 19th century visitors to the village that began in Knox County in 1808 and closed in 1826. Two hundred years after its founding, West Union retains two historic distinctions: it was the westernmost major Shaker village in the country and the Shaker community most directly affected by the War of 1812.
Price: $35.00
Beginning with the early development of the territory in Northern Kentucky, the story of Lincoln-Grant School in Covington, Kentucky, takes the reader on a journey from the pre-Civil War era through a seemingly timeless period of racial separation, to the end of legally segregated public schools in the United States of America. As it sorts through the rationales, the legalities, and the events surrounding one of many racially segregated schools in the United States, the dialogue unfolds the larger story of human relationships between two primary racial groups in America--black and white.
Price: $6.00
The author describes the miraculous survival of the 26th Infantry, Alpha Company, the Blue Spaders, during the Tet offensive or surprise attack of the North Vietnamese Army as they went about their task of road clearing on Highway 13 (aka Thunder Road) between Lai Khe and Quan Loi in Vietnam. The author credits their survival to Psalm 91 KJV. Steve Simms is also the author of Common Valor: Ambush at Srok Rung, November 7, 1967.


Read a review here.